4/04/2014

D is for DOG











D is for DOG


Running today.  Oil changed. Dining room chairs to upholstery. Lunch and good conversation with Solveig. Dog to the Groomer.

Poor Leia was a mess. Tending to all that is happening in the house I hardly have time to brush and groom her and she looked terrible. I am sure when she was outside people looked and frowned and
knew for sure that I am not doing a good job as her "mother". Ah, me.

Joe takes good care of her. Afterall he is her breeder. As he was for our other Shih Tzu, Chuchu.

Leia is a sweet, independent and stubborn dog. She favors men because she really was attached to Jim. We got her right after he retired from hospital practice and he was around the house most of the time since he was seeing patients in his home office. He feed her, walked her and taught her tricks. Tricks which she remembers and occasionally does spontaneously just to remind me that she has special talents. Now, poor dear, she is stuck with me.

When Jim died her grief was as deep as mine - and I think she thought I had done something that sent him away. She held that grudge for months - until I took in the kitten. Another one of her "kind."
Having the kitten in the house, and then and now as a playmate and pal brought Leia back to her former good natured self. I think she also came to realize that I was the one who was feeding her now.

Lately I am providing a marvelous gift to her.  My neighbor's son, 16 years old, comes several afernoons a week to take her for a walk. When the light changes to afternoon she begins to watch the front door. The door bell rings and she jumps up and down, bursting with excitement. She is ready to go.

He is not Jim with bits of ham treats in his pockets but he is her "pass" for a long walk and her friend.
Making this arrangement is the smartest and kindest thing I have done since Jim left.

Maybe I did not think of it all on my own.

1 comment:

storytellermary said...

Sounds like a nice gift for the neighbor as well, meaningful work and connection . . . an important prelude to a lifetime of good work.